About

Crickets dance is owned and operated by a mother daughter team,  Cricket and Jan Radcliff.  The mission of Crickets dance is to  offer  dance consulting, and provide informative views, opinions, and instruction, regarding competitive and technical dance training and drill team.

Crickets Dance serves a diverse clientele of dancers ages K-12 (and adult).  Our clients are often self-referred, and seek out our services for technical training in ballet, contemporary, and jazz  performance dance.  Our client relationships are generally long term, and involve face-to-face instruction in a studio type environment.  Our clients are looking for that edge in technical abilities that will help them or a team better prepare and perform at state and national dance competitions.

Our secondary clients include local dance studios who hire Crickets Dance to work with their students in a studio setting to instruct them in ballet and other forms of dance technique, and with instructional choreography.

 Who we are

C r i c k e t  R a d c l i f f ,  O w n e r

Cricket  Radcliff  received  her formal education from Utah State University.  She holds  two degrees including a degree in  business  from the Huntsman’s School of Business.

BALLET

Cricket began retraining to become an instructor for beginner ballet classes, under the tutelage of Belinda Hurst, who studied at the University of Utah Department of Ballet (Ballet West). She assisted in ballet, pre-pointe and pointe classes. She studied under Belinda Hurst since age 3 ½, for a total of nearly 15 years, and went en pointe at age 9, and began assistant teaching at age 15.

In high school she  studied summer intensives under Kelly Hudgins, former professional  ballerina for the Texas Ballet.

JAZZ/LYRICAL/MODERN

The portion Crickets team preparatory-instruction in jazz, was through Becky Ripper at the Red Rock Stars Dance Studio. Lyrical instruction was through Belinda Hurst. She  also took individual instruction one-on-one with top solo instructors from the Moab area for over 10 years.

Cricket was responsible for training and testing students on the dance challenge routines from beginner through advanced. Students leveled up by passing off all the technical skills on each level including combination skills in ballet, jazz, and tumbling. There are eight technical levels to advanced. She is well versed in classroom training, and has worked many years as a smalls team instructor/choreographer. She has  worked with and instructed classes as large as 45 students, learning entire camp routines and teaching them to students and other instructors. She also has assisted in both team and production/novelty choreography for both regional and national dance competitions.

SOLO INSTRUCTION

Cricket has worked with dozens of soloists and a numerous duet groups. Her studies in this area were a reflection of teachings from former top instructors, Stephanie Davis, and Charlotte Walden.  She specializes in individual  training.

TUMBLING

Cricket began tumbling at age 6 with American gymnast instructors. She later was instructed by Belinda Hurst at the Red Rock Stars Studio. She works with students who can show a level of skill and confidence necessary for solo competition.

Cricket has recently taught at the Moab Academy of Dance as a team and solo instructor.  She also continues to work independently providing summer intensive camps, and individual technical and solo training.

J a n   R a d c l i f  f ,  D i r e c t o r   

10847957_10152659628058422_6578456198006827301_nJan  Radcliff received her undergraduate degree in Business Management from the Huntsman’s School of Business. She also holds an advanced master’s degree in Instructional Technology and Learning Sciences from Utah State University.  Her expertise is in “learning how people learn”, and then developing training platforms for them to learn from.  Her abilities to communicate and collaborate effectively both in person and at a distance are some of her leading strong points.  She has  experience building productive and positive relationships with diverse dance partners.   Jan’s understanding of dance is admirable, and she truly enjoys co-assisting with choreography.  She thrives in a dance setting, and works efficiently for Crickets Dance as a dance consultant and web developer.   As Jan would say “I love to color – digitally”.

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Our methods

  1. The Cecchetti method is a ballet training method devised by the Italian ballet master Enrico Cecchetti (1850-1928). The method is a strict training system with special concern for anatomy within the confines of classical ballet technique, and seeks to develop the essential characteristics of dance in its students through a rigid training regime. The goal is for the student to learn to dance by studying and internalizing the basic principles, in an effort to become self-reliant rather than imitating the movements executed by their teacher.

Crickets Dance Camp 6/16-17 Father’s Day Special!

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It was fun to see everyone today.  Had a lot of fun!  Tomorrow is hip hop – yea!!!  Thanks to Malina (Grand County High School Devilette) for helping out!  It is fun to get together on the off season and work together.

Learning the dance to Bombay was a good experience.  I was proud to see everyone remembered most of the dance at the review at the end.  You guys looked awesome.  Can’t wait to see what you do with the Hip Hop tomorrow.

I look forward to working with may of you this next year with your individual solo’s , team and ballet  classes.  

 

Terminology vs. Slang

Cricket and Kim, back stage of "Peter Pan" the ballet

As teachers, we all struggle at times when it comes to training our young students proper terminology and technique. Being able to relay to them the correct terms and positions, and have them mimic back what they have learned is often a wobbly feat at first.

Connecting all the movements, and making them appear strong and sharp is what we strive for. For some, the learning comes easier than for others. Practice has a lot to do with it. You can train your students in the proper form, but if they don’t practice – all that hard work can fall on deaf ears. Students need to want to be there. They need to want to learn.

It is critical that teachers and assistant teachers know the proper terminology, and be able to demonstrate the movements. You can’t learn it from reading a book. It takes years of practice, and concentrated muscle memory to become skilled in the art of dance technique. As well, it takes years of study to learn the proper terms (and slang).

Dancing throughout the years, most have probably heard different terminology used for different movements. Take for instance a jete lanses (turning leap), or better known to others as a barrel leap or calypso.  Which term is correct? The Jete lanses is the original term. The turning leap and/or barrel leap are a cultural manifestations, as is the calypso. It really depends on where you are dancing, as to what it is called. Many only know it by one name only. Some also confuse a renverse’ with a turning leap, but they too are not the same. A lot of the original ballet movements have had cultural slang words created to describe them.  View the Jete lanses/barrel leap here: A barrel leap

I like the definition of a “leap over a log” on Off Jazz’s website. You can view it here.  I would be interested to know what others might call it. What is the ballet term?

The back bone of dance is technique.   Having said that, I do know that  a lot of new technique has been developed over the last 50 years, that has created whole new forms of dance. You can probably think of a lot,like, Hip Hop, Lindy, or Modern, or Contemporary. Each genre of dance seems to have taken something from the other. You have whole new vocabularies to describe movement in dance. It’s cultural and it’s still growing. What I do notice about all these genres of dance, is the basic’s of Cecchetti Ballet.  There still seems to be a hint of Cecchetti in all the genres.

When you start to research the origins of dance, you begin to learn about the rituals that came with it. All that cultural stuff. The most ancient images of dance depict people dancing before their gods, as a form of worship. Dance as entertainment isn’t seen until about 1400 BC . Egyptian paintings show women in lose clothing and  musicians, on the walls of tombs. It was thought that these women dancers would keep the males delighted in the next world.

Ballet first appeared in Rome during the Roman Pantomime. But it disappeared during the mid-evil time period. It returned in the lavish plays and dances put on for kings and courts in the early years of the Renaissance.

Terminology goes through changes, as with anything else. Cecchetti Ballet, was the product of one, ENRICO CECCHETTI.   When you think about dance terminology, most people in the US have trained under the Cecchetti Ballet method in some form or another.

It is well worth knowing the correct terminology for ballet. That way you aren’t thrown off when someone uses an incorrect term. Teach your students wisely. If you teach them correctly the first time, you shouldn’t have to repeat the lesson too often.


Drama Momma I

 

Guess you can’t really have a site without first addressing one of hardest topics of all – “drama momma”… “momma drama”….

This little article is not meant to demean anyone. I
‘m not pointing fingers or tagging anyone in a thread as being one. It’s just a fact that in the world of dance you have Drama.

I haven’t seen anyone else stepping up to the plate to talk about the issue, so I’m assuming none of you have drama, right?  Right…..

This is an old article fist posted March 19, 2009 at 6:18pm .  So, if you feel this article is talking about you – maybe you should consider the advice it contains, and seek to make changes in your life.   I began writing about people like Abby Lee, before she and her fellow actors became a reality show phenomenon.  Mamma drama, or the term, stage parent, are nothing new.

I was told not to go easy… so here goes….

The following  statement is meant to warm you up, and welcome you to the land of mama drama.

Well the blood sucking venomous cow! Don’t go waging your finger in my face. My baby is above your rules.

Life in the dance world doesn’t have to be filled with drama every single day. With that being said, some of you are laughing at me already. You should be careful however; I might be describing you within this text.

Offended already? Not yet? No?  You might be thinking I’m a stupid know-it all old crow who talks to dinosaurs.  Good!  You keep thinking that, and  let’s get down to business then.

Any mom or dad that has a child in dance should know a little about the world of stage/dance competition before signing their little darlings up for class. You may innocently think that your family (child) is above the drama.

Why would you think that? Because you are spiritual maybe?  Or your political views, family values, etc., are stead fast? You know you represent the elite amongst the crowd – and rise far above simple drama.

Why you are so good and so helpful to all the new parents – without even being asked to help. You help in many ways. You begin by explaining to any new parent you meet your experiences with little you-know-who, and the other parental units in the group that need to be avoided. You explain the difficulties of the past, and then tell them they are lucky it isn’t happening  now.

Did you just fall for that crap? If you did – I have a bridge I’d like to sell you.

Anyone who starts off with the statement “do you know so-and-so”?  RUN… RUN away really fast!

Most seasoned dance parents know that if they have their child signed up for classes everyday of the week, and in all the advanced classes, they are now somehow entitled. Hummm, entitled to what?

Maybe it gives them an advantage as far as what classes they are in, but it doesn’t give them a reason to bad mouth, or isolate others.  Doesn’t mean you get the lead or the Presidents position either.  It’s based on merit only!

You may have your child on the bare minimum plan, one class “period”. Surely no drama can take place in one class right? You have a mamma, then you have drama.

Next day the phone of the studio is ringing off the wall with some angry parent wanting to know why you are destroying the precious psyche of their little darling.

It only takes one person – one little tiny person to kick off world war #4 on the dance floor.  Say that real fast “world war #4 on the dance floor!” It generally begins with, so- and-so said this and so-and-so did that.

Next day the phone of the studio is ringing off the wall with some angry parent wanting to know why you are destroying the precious psyche of their little darling.  As an instructor, you are totally oblivious to the whole affair, but you try to reasonably assure the frantic parent you will look into the matter. You agree to sit in on the class and observe.

I find that it is easy to spot the weak teachers from the strong. The weak teachers quickly put the little darling trouble maker up front.  The “I’m in the special spot -I’m in front and your not,” spot. Of course this poor teacher has unknowingly just fed into the fire storm rolling down hill in his or her direction.

Next day, another call comes into the studio. As you listen you almost can feel the anger of the parent  through the very fibers of the phone line. You are bombarded with negative comments like “you play favorites at that studio”, and “you let your friends brat’s control everything”, and “your kid gets everything even when I’m paying your big fat bill each month”.

Ever wonder why it is hard to get the director on the phone? See above….

Let’s play a game.

Suppose we have 7, 8, 9, 10 or more, of these special little dancing darlings in a class. It’s time to give out positions and learn the brand new transitions to those positions. Well, let me tell you, NATURE has a pecking order. It’s the primeval instinct that is born into the survival of the fittest – it’s called competition.  I can just hear it. Mommie she put me in the back for the opening.”

Frankly, there is a lot of special treatment handed out at studios. I’d like to think it is because of the hard work and dedication of those students who are successfully following directions and thus improving. But, it isn’t always true, and that is unfortunate.

It is also hard to work with students when you have your own child on the front line. Any of you who do have children in your own studio know it is true. When your child fails to accomplish good things – It is a double edge sword for sure. You love dance, and your kid doesn’t. It can quickly become a battle field.

The number of times I’ve watched a studio owner put their own child up front even when they couldn’t get the simply movements down – is numerous. All I could do was secretly hope their phone rang off the wall the next day.  Well, maybe I will just meet one of those newbie moms at the door and warn them about it. NOT!

I love this thing called dance, don’t you?

Now you understand I’m just looking at some of the negatives. But, unfortunately, things like this really happen. As good as you may want things to turn out, the potential for mamma drama, or drama in general can ruin the best of days. Don’t let it.

If someone is taking advantage of your child, it is the responsibility of the parent to look into the matter. It doesn’t matter if you own a studio or not. But, to all those blood sucking venomous cows who are just trying to live their lives out though their children, it’s time to stop. Your children deserve to live their lives and learn lessons in the world for themselves. I’m talking about the simple lessons in life  like, “you can’t have the front because you pitch a fit and call your mommie”. And mommies, you can’t micro-manager everything they do. It isn’t healthy.

Parents need to learn that their job is to be the cheerleader. You do have a role. You are their greatest fan. You have to cheer them on, even when you know the outcome may mean they didn’t win at a competition, or get the lead in the dance. They might not have even made the cut. The important thing is that your child tried to do something, and that should be rewarded with praise.

Parents sometimes push their young children out onto the stage without thinking about the fears and anxiety that comes with that event. Stage fright is real. Some kids love it – others don’t. As parents, we really shouldn’t ask our kids to do more than we ourselves would be willing to do.

Parents need to actively sit on the side lines and let their children grow up. You can’t jump in there and beat up the 2nd grade teacher because she moved our child to the side or back, or made them sit in the naughty chair, and call their parent.

At some time in the dance game, you will be surprised with something you might not be expecting. Usher in the teenage years.

Experienced teenage dancers should have their acts down pretty good by this time. Doesn’t mean they don’t sharpen their claws however. The thing with this age group “teen something” is it really isn’t much different from 3rd grade.

The biggest difference for girls is PMS, and many of them let you know about it too. I’m not so conservative that I can’t say “GET OVER YOUR PMS”!  If you have a doctor’s note “fine”.  If not, you are expected to be on the dance floor ready to go.  Besides Menopause trumps PMS.  I’m on it 24/7 – wanta go there with me?!….. I didn’t think so.

I had to explain to a group of cheerleaders about the benefits of good hygiene one time. They were appalled when we got to the part about smelly tights. Did their moms just stop talking to them? I wondered..…

If you dance or do any type of sport, you will have smelly tights. Boys too. Deodorant can save a lot of students from embarrassment. I don’t wait for the other students to pick on a member of the group – I let them ALL know up front where they can find deodorant samples at the front counter area. “Please take a sample home with you – and use it!”

It is one thing to leave the studio smelling like something the cat drug in; it is another to show up already smelling that way. Do your best with that one.

Kids are cruel. One little hair out of place, a rip in a garment and you are scarred for the week. I love the poster of the ballet point shoes that are beat up and tore. I think every studio should have that poster hanging at the front door. Clean nice neat shoes are a sure sign of a weak studio, and weak dancers. The more beat up – the better. Many studio dancers don’t dance with shoes at all! Most use  PAWS,  Foot Undies, an old sock, or just go barefoot (except for ballet).

Clothing on young dancers varies depending on what genre of dance you are teaching. Ballet is one of the strictest, and for good reason. Leotards, tights, proper shoes, and hair back – that is proper for ballet. There should be no jewelry, or minimum at the least. From ballet, clothing can vary.

It’s easier to have everyone wearing the same thing. The warm up outfits don’t have to be ugly either. There are so many options that students and studios can choose from. Rule of thumb “get input from the students on costumes” – they DO know style.  You can always turn down inappropriate clothing.

I have TROUBLE with students who show up with their butts showing, guts hanging out sporting the latest belly ring fashion, or tops that have to be adjusted every 6 to 8 counts. Not cool. I’m not too hip on tattoo’s either. Body art should be washable.

If I wanted to view someone’s art I’d visit an art gallery. I prefer a team that looks like a team rather than a group all competing for a chance to glorify their solo body art. If it can’t be covered by the costume or shoes don’t get it.

“Well you blood sucking venomous cow!” Yep, that would be me. I’ve heard worse.

Drama Mama’s come in many sizes, shapes, personalities, and economical social cliché’s. No group is immune.

Some words from the past:

  • “Well, don’t you just think you’re miss hottsey-tottsey?”
  • “Crawl down off that cross and give someone else a turn.”
  • “I hear she’s sleeping around.”
  • “Little miss perfect – got caught.”
  • “I’m going to take you to the school board”
  • “My child deserves home coming queen”
  • “She/he is a back stabbing little beep”
  • “I’ll show them!”
  • “I’m back baby”
  • “My child is the best jock”
  • “My, my, my tie is on so tight, the blood vessel in my neck might pop!”

Some of you are thinking “are you the real deal?” “Would I want my child around you,” “is she this way in class,” “and is this how it really is?” “My sweet little baby is so much better than this. I may home school”.

Well, I’m not that way. But if you are offended by what you have read here, competition studio dance or drill, may not be the way for you go. This is how it can be. But, it doesn’t have to be.

If you don’t know ANY warning signs, you may be setting little Julie or John up for a bad experience. Growing up is tough, and some parents have a hard time adjusting to that fact.

You should also Read

Momma Drama II “Re-Visited”
Stage Moms and “call security” Stage Dads.


Some would argue that if you get control at the beginning and set up ground rules “it just isn’t allowed” that makes it not happen. People… It happens.  Yes control at the beginning is GOOD, but it will not keep all of the drama out.

One thing I can state, is that I don’t have small children in dance anymore. I don’t eat, sleep, and drink my college student’s life for them either. I’d like too !  Darn, I guess I have to trust that they actually learned how to maneuver through the blood sucking venomous cows on campus and off.

Many parents would love to be at college with their children.  They would be the best helicopter parents you ever seen. Unfortunately for them however, the administrative staff usually discovers where the parent  landing pads are, and turn the lights out on it.  They can’t seem to land anymore.

Oh empty nest! It’s almost as bad as third grade.

Love your dancers; trust them to make the best decisions. Don’t micro manager everything that happens in their lives. Let them live. Set them free and they will come back to you. After all, you’re their biggest fan. They love you. They just want you to be proud of them.  Getting boo boo’s on the knee is part of growing up.

Dance is a discipline.  Your child will have to learn that.

There is a thing called the unforgivable momma – drama. As a teacher the hardest thing is to hold someone else’s baby when they cry and they tell you their mommie hates them because they are stupid. They have the bruises too. I have called Department of Child and Family Services. Yes I have.

From a well seasoned drama momma survior,  to all my blood sucking venomous cow friends! I don’t really miss you!

Ha ha..Yea I guess I do.. Some of you..

Jan

You should also Read

Momma Drama I

Momma Drama II “Re-Visited”
Stage Moms and “call security” Stage Dads.